Denali (McKinley) - Altitude 6,194m/20,320ft - Duration 27 Days - Grade 3D

Denali is the highest mountain in North America. The original name of Mount McKinley, Denali or 'The High One' is once again in common usage in Alaska. Denali is situated 150 miles (250km) to the north of Anchorage in the Alaska Range, close to the Arctic Circle. It rises dramatically above the tundra of the National Park, dwarfing the surrounding peaks. Despite its fearsome and well-justified reputation for bad weather, the mountain draws climbers from all over the world. Several hundred people attempt the climb each year, attracted by its status as one of the Seven Summits, its accessibility and the relatively low technical demands of the West Buttress Route. However, it is wise not to underestimate the undertaking, as Denali is a very big mountain, offering an experience more akin to the larger Himalayan giants. Dealing with the commitment, physical endurance, altitude and Arctic cold and storms, provides an incredible challenge.

Sponsors

The whole expedition will cost £100,000 so we plan to match this cost and raise £100,000 for Cancer Research.

With charities it is not only the fundraising that is important! Raising awareness, heightening charity profile and commitment from corporate sponsors and individuals is another vital piece in the charity jigsaw puzzle.

It is safe to say that everyone in their life will have been touched by cancer in some way, therefore support to Cancer Research is imperative.

Firstly donating to Just Giving will make a difference but costs of the expedition are also required.

We need sponsors to cover the cost of the expedition so most of our time can be spent fund-raising for the charity.

A maximum of 2 sponsors will be required for each mountain as this will enable us to focus all our advertising and Media exposure to include both these sponsors.

Sponsors will also be on our new website and all printed advertising regarding our Expedition. On top of this website addresses and logos will be sewn into garments worn on the climb, and most importantly your company logo and name will be captured with Steven at the summit of the mountain..

For more information on becoming a sponsor please contact

steven@8summits.co.uk

Notable Features

Mount McKinley has a larger bulk and rise than Mount Everest, although the summit of Everest is higher at 29,029 feet (8,848 m). Everest's base sits on the Tibetan Plateau[citation needed] at about 17,000 feet (5,200 m), giving it a real vertical rise of a little more than 12,000 feet (3,700 m).

The base of Mount McKinley is roughly at 2,000-foot (610 m) elevation, giving it an actual rise of 18,000 feet (5,500 m). The mountain is also characterized by extremely cold weather. Temperatures as low as -75.5F (-60C) and windchills as low as -118.1F (-83C) have been recorded by an automated weather station located at 18,700 feet (5,700 m).

According to the National Park Service, in 1932 the Liek-Lindley expedition recovered a self-recording minimum thermometer left near Browne's Tower, at about 15,000 feet (4,600 m), on Mount McKinley by the Stuck-Karstens party in 1913. The spirit thermometer was calibrated down to 95 degrees below zero and the lowest recorded temperature was below that point.

Harry J. Liek took the thermometer back to Washington, D.C. where it was tested by the United States Weather Bureau and found to be accurate. The lowest temperature that it had recorded was found to be approximately -100F (-73.3C) degrees. There is also a higher risk of altitude illness for climbers than its altitude would otherwise suggest, due to its high latitude.

At the equator, a mountain as high as Mount McKinley would have 47% as much oxygen available on its summit as compared to sea level, but because of its latitude, the pressure on the summit of McKinley is even lower at 42%

Climbing history

The first recorded attempt to climb Mount McKinley was by Judge James Wickersham in 1903, via the Peters Glacier and the North Face, now known as the Wickersham Wall. This route has tremendous avalanche danger and was not successfully climbed until 1963.

Famed explorer Dr. Frederick Cook claimed the first ascent of the mountain in 1906. His claim was regarded with some suspicion from the start, but was also widely believed. It was later proved fraudulent, with some crucial evidence provided by Bradford Washburn when he was sketched on a lower peak.

In 1910, four locals (Tom Lloyd, Peter Anderson, Billy Taylor, and Charles McGonagall), known as the Sourdough expedition, attempted McKinley, despite a complete lack of climbing experience. They spent approximately three months on the mountain.

However, their purported summit day was impressive: carrying a bag of doughnuts, each a thermos of hot chocolate, and a 14-foot (4.2 m) spruce pole, two of them reached the North Summit, the lower of the two, and erected the pole near the top. According to them, they took a total of 18 hours, a record that has yet to be breached (as of 2006). No one believed their success (partly due to false claims that they had climbed both summits) until the true first ascent, in 1913.

Photo Galleries

*Galleries are still under construction*

Sponsors List

Sponsors for Kilimanjaro and Mont Blanc.

Infinity Maintenance Ltd. MediaCorp Online.

Equipment Sponsors

Cotswold Outdoor.